Category Archives: Food

Simple Sauteed Kohlrabi

Simple Delicious Sauteed Kohlrabi

Kohlrabi is one of those vegetables that many of us don’t know what to do with. Most of us didn’t grow up eating it, so it’s really foreign to us. I’m in that same group. I had a request from a viewer to explore kohlrabi, so I have!

Here’s one way I found to cook the bulb of kohlrabi. This simple recipe for sauteed kohlrabi is really easy and quick to make, and involves ingredients that you likely have on hand. Below is a video demonstration of the recipe with the written recipe below that. Enjoy!

I hope this helps!
Judi

Easy Sautéed Kohlrabi
Makes About 3 Servings

1 raw kohlrabi bulb
1 Tbsp extra virgin olive oil*
Garlic powder to taste (or 1 clove garlic, finely chopped)
Salt and pepper to taste
About 1 tsp dried cilantro or parsley, or to taste
Water as needed (1 or 2 tablespoons at a time)
Juice of ½ lemon or lime
More cilantro or parsley, optional garnish

Remove the stems and leaves from the kohlrabi. Wash the bulb very well. Remove the peel and cut the kohlrabi into large cubes or bite-size pieces.

Heat a skillet over just above medium heat. Add the olive oil (or water if preferred) and allow it to heat up briefly. If using fresh garlic, add the chopped garlic and allow it to heat through briefly. Add the chopped kohlrabi. Sprinkle with garlic powder (if using it), salt, pepper and cilantro or parsley to taste. Stir-fry the combo for a minute or so.

Add one or two tablespoons of water and place the lid on the skillet. When the steam stops and the pan is almost dry (this happens quickly), stir the vegetables around and add a little more water; replace the lid. Repeat this process until they are just barely the desired crisp-tenderness that you like. Drizzle the lemon or lime juice over the mixture. Replace the lid and allow it to finish cooking, which shouldn’t take long…a minute or so. Taste and adjust seasonings, if needed. You can garnish with more cilantro or parsley, if desired. The entire process should take 10 to 15 minutes, depending upon the size of the kohlrabi pieces and the amount of tenderness you prefer.

Note: This dish is best eaten when freshly made.

*If you prefer to use no oil, just use water instead.

Sauteed Kohlrabi Greens

EASY Sauteed Kohlrabi Greens

Wondering what to do with kohlrabi and the greens? Here’s a very EASY recipe for sauteed kohlrabi greens using simple ingredients. It cooks up quickly and makes a nice side dish with many meals. Below is the recipe, following by a video demonstration of cooking the greens.

Below that is my video on the basics of kohlrabi. In it, I explain what it is, how to choose kohlrabi, store it, preserve it, and prepare it. If you haven’t tried it, then it’s time to explore this unusual vegetable. It’s a “2 for 1 deal” where you get delicious greens AND the bulb vegetable all in one!

EASY Sauteed Kohlrabi Greens
Makes about 4 Servings

Leaves and stems from 3 kohlrabi bulbs
1 Tbsp extra virgin olive oil
1 large clove garlic, finely chopped
Salt and pepper to taste
Juice of half a lemon*
Water as needed (about 1 cup)

Remove the leaves and stems from three kohlrabi bulbs. Wash them well, then cut them into bite size pieces.

Heat a skillet on just over medium heat. Add the extra virgin olive oil and allow it to heat briefly. Add the garlic and allow it to saute briefly, taking care not to burn it. Add the kohlrabi greens and 2 or 3 tablespoons of water. Add salt and pepper to the greens and a little more water if needed; stir to combine. Cover the skillet and allow the greens to steam until they reach the desired tenderness that you like, or about 15 minutes. IMPORTANT! Check them very often to be sure the pan does not run dry. Add small amounts of water as needed so the greens cook with a minimal amount of water.

When the greens are done to your liking, drizzle with the lemon juice. Stir to combine and serve.

* If you do not have lemon juice, a very small amount of vinegar of your choice may be substituted. Start with a small amount, 1 or 2 teaspoons (to taste with the greens) and add up to a total of 1 tablespoon of vinegar, if desired.

Kohlrabi

Kohlrabi 101 – The Basics

In reviewing a number of comments from my YouTube viewers, I realized that many people want to work more vegetables into their meals, but are not sure how to do it. They might not be overly comfortable with cooking. They may not be familiar with specific vegetables and how to prepare them. They may not like the flavor of vegetables, yet they know they should eat them. So with that, I started a new series of videos (with accompanying blogs) on “Vegetables 101” covering from the basics to preparing them in specific ways. Kohlrabi was one of the first vegetables a viewer asked to learn about. So, we’re off and running! A link to the video is below, followed by the information notes.

I hope all this helps!
Judi

Kohlrabi 101 – The Basics

1. About
Kohlrabi is called a German “cabbage-turnip” and is in the cruciferous family…same as cabbage and broccoli.

Varieties: green or purple bulbs (no flavor differences; flesh is the same color)

Both the bulb and greens are edible. The flavor is described as a sweet turnip with texture of an apple.

The bulb and greens can be eaten raw or cooked.

2. Nutrition tidbits
Low in calories: 1 cup has 36 calories
High in fiber, potassium, vitamin C, vitamin B6, folate, thiamine, and also has some calcium, and a little protein too.

Kohlrabi is mentioned in this video by Dr. Michael Greger about the chemicals in the vegetable that help the liver in its detoxification function… https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L1euD1U2pH8

3. How to select
Choose smaller variety (3-4”)…more tender and sweeter flavor than larger ones
Smaller bulbs taste more like broccoli; larger bulbs taste more radish-like and can be woody

4. How is it usually eaten…raw or cooked?
Bulb and leaves can be eaten raw or cooked
Stems and leaves can be used in recipes like kale or collard greens
The bulbs can be roasted, baked, stir-fried, steamed, boiled, grilled, mashed, added to soups and stews

5. Fresh vs frozen vs canned
Only available fresh (as far as I know)

6. Cooking/serving methods
Preparation: Remove stems and leaves. Wash everything well. Remove the peel from the bulb with a paring knife…it can be tough to eat. (Be careful! It can be hard to peel! But once peeled, it is easy to slice.)

Raw: Can be added to salads or slaws, or sliced for a snack with a dip.

Cooked:
Add to soups, stews, or mash it with (or like) potatoes
Can be roasted (brings out the sweetness)
Stems/leaves can be used like kale or collards
Steam pieces of the bulb to preserves nutrients

7. How to preserve it
Remove stems/leaves soon after purchasing and use them within a few days of purchasing. The bulbs will keep longer, wrapped, in the refrigerator. Wash, dry, then wrap in plastic or paper and store in refrigerator for 1-3 weeks. To store CUT bulbs, wrap tightly in plastic and use within a few days.

TO FREEZE:
Both the bulbs and leaves can be frozen.

To freeze the leaves:
Wash and cut leaves into desired size pieces. Boil leaves for about 3 minutes. Drain them and place them immediately into ice water. Allow them to remain there at least 3 minutes, until completely cooled. Drain them well and place them into labeled freezer bags. They should keep for 8 to 10 months.

To freeze the bulbs:
Wash and peel the bulbs. Cut them into desired size pieces. Boil (blanch) chunks or thick slices of kohlrabi bulbs for 3 minutes; boil (blanch) small cubes for 1 minute. Drain immediately then submerge in ice water to quickly cool after blanching. Leave them in the ice water at least as long as they were in the boiling water to completely cool them down. Drain well and place in labeled freezer bags. They will keep 8-10 months in the freezer.

8. Herbs/spices that go well with kohlrabi
Garlic, onions, parsley, caraway, curry, tarragon, thyme, allspice, basil, cilantro, mustard, dill, rosemary, turmeric, marjoram

9. Other foods that go well with kohlrabi
Dairy: Butter, sour cream, parmesan, Swiss cheese, and cream

Fruits and Veggies: Cabbage, broccoli, mushrooms, carrots, fennel, celery root, potatoes, spinach, turnips, corn, bean sprouts, lemons, and apples (in a slaw), celery, leeks, onions

Savory: Sesame oil, bacon, rice, quinoa, seafood, chicken, and beef.

Serving Suggestions:
Enjoy kohlrabi raw, steamed, fried, boiled, baked, grilled or roasted! Just ensure you remove any tough outer skin before eating the bulbs and eat the leaves as you would kale or turnip greens.

In addition to being eaten on its own, kohlrabi is delicious added to soups, stews and curries. They can be stir-fried with other veggies and served over rice for a quick dinner and even cooked and mashed in with potato.

10. Recipe links
Roasted Kohlrabi https://www.thespruceeats.com/roasted-kohlrabi-recipe-2216540

Coconut Kohlrabi Lemon Soup https://cookingontheweekends.com/coconut-kohlrabi-lemon-soup/

Kohlrabi Slaw https://www.allrecipes.com/recipe/215001/kohlrabi-slaw/

Assorted recipes using kohlrabi… https://www.freshforkmarket.com/recipes/kohlrabi-4-easy-ways/

Kohlrabi Apple Salad https://cookieandkate.com/2015/crispy-apple-kohlrabi-salad-recipe/

Kohlrabi and Carrots https://www.geniuskitchen.com/recipe/kohlrabi-carrots-10554

Sautéed Kale and Kohlrabi https://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/sauteed-kale-with-kohlrabi-354974

Mashed Kohlrabi and Cauliflower https://thelemonbowl.com/mashed-cauliflower-and-kohlrabi/

Kohlrabi with White Sauce https://www.allrecipes.com/recipe/145757/kohlrabi-with-white-sauce/

Quinoa with Vegetables Over Tomatoes

Here’s an easy dish that makes a lovely presentation and is refreshing on a warm day. Because quinoa is a good source of protein, it can be used as a meatless main dish or also an excellent side dish. Either way, it’s yummy! Here’s a video showing how I made this dish. Below the video is the recipe!

Happy eating!!
Judi

Quinoa with Vegetables over Tomatoes
Makes about 4 Main Dish Servings
Makes about 6 Side Servings

1 Tbsp butter
1 Tbsp extra virgin olive oil
1/4 to 1/3 cup chopped onion
1 clove garlic, minced
1 medium carrot, peeled and finely chopped
4 oz button mushrooms (about 6 each)
1 cup quinoa, rinsed and drained
1 tsp dried parsley
Salt and pepper to taste
2 cups + 2 Tbsp water
1-1/2 to 2 cups chopped fresh spinach
2-4 medium fresh tomatoes, sliced into wedges*

Optional garnishes (use one or any combination desired):
Basil, parsley cilantro, sesame seeds, juice of ½ lemon or lime

In a medium-large saucepan (with a lid), heat the butter and oil over medium heat. Add the onion and sauté briefly. Add the garlic, carrot, and mushrooms, and sauté briefly until the vegetables begin to cook. Stir in the (uncooked) quinoa, parsley, salt and pepper, and allow the quinoa to toast briefly.

Add the water and stir to combine, making sure all the quinoa is in the water. Cover the pot and turn the heat up to bring everything to a boil. Turn the timer on for 15 minutes as soon as the water comes to a boil. Then turn the heat down to medium low and allow everything to simmer until the timer goes off.

Turn the burner off; stir in the spinach. Cover the pan and remove it from the hot burner. Allow the mixture to rest for 5 minutes in the covered pan. Fluff with a fork and serve over tomato wedges that were arranged in a pinwheel design on the plate.

*Another option: Rather than serving the quinoa over tomato wedges, you could reserve one whole tomato per person and do the following: Slice off the top and remove the seeded area of the tomato. Spoon the quinoa mixture into the tomato, filling it to the top. Place the top of the tomato back in its place. Place filled tomatoes in a glass baking dish (not greased) and into a preheated 400F oven for 10 to 15 minutes, until the tomatoes JUST begin to cook. This would make a lovely side dish with many types of meals. It’s delicious!

NEW Tip for Saving Fresh Vegetable Juice

It didn’t take me long after getting into drinking fresh vegetable juice every day that I realized I can’t devote that much time to the endeavor on a daily basis. Yes, I realize that’s the best way to drink it, but few people can do that every day. So, I did a little experimenting and found a new way to help keep that juice fresh a little longer. Here’s my video where I talk about it.

No time to watch the video? So what’s the tip?? Add about 1/2 teaspoon of pure ascorbic acid powder to your freshly made juice before it’s poured into individual jars. That amount of ascorbic acid powder has a LOT of vitamin C power, which is a proven antioxidant and works wonders as a preservative. I have found that my fresh juice is keeping far better now even though I’m also following all the other usual tips for preserving juice.

Happy juicing! I hope this helps 🙂
Judi

Cook Brown Rice in the Crock Pot…EASY!

Cooking brown rice in the crock pot is really easy and takes no effort at all. I have found it to be perfect every time following my simple recipe. The only key is that it’s not something to put on in the morning before you leave for work since it only takes a couple hours to cook. So, make sure you’ll be around to take it out when the time is right.

Here’s a video showing how to cook one cup of brown rice in the crock pot. The recipe is below the video.

Crock Pot Brown Rice (Basic Recipe)
Makes About 3 Cups

1 cup brown rice (short or long grain), rinsed and drained
2 cups water
Butter and salt (optional)

Lightly butter the inside of your crock pot, if desired. (This step not only adds flavor to the rice, but helps keep it from sticking to the crock. Alternately you could lightly coat it with the oil of your choice or use nonstick cooking spray.) Add 1 cup rinsed and drained brown rice of your choice. Add salt, if desired. Add 2 cups water and be sure all the rice is below the water.

Cover the crock pot and cook on high for two hours. Done!

After posting that video I experimented with expanding the recipe to cooking two cups of rice. Here’s my follow-up video on the adjusted recipe. The written recipe is below the video link.

Cook Brown Rice in the Crock Pot (Increased Recipe)
Makes about 6 Cups

2 cups brown rice (short or long grain), rinsed and drained
3-1/2 cups water
Butter and salt (optional)

Rub the inside of the crock pot with butter, if desired. (This optional step not only gives flavor to the rice, but helps to keep the rice from sticking to the sides of the crock. Alternately, you could rub it with the oil of your choice, or spray the crock with nonstick cooking spray.) Add the rinsed and drained rice and sprinkle with salt, if desired. Add the water and be sure all the rice is below the water.

Cover the crock pot and cook on high for 2 hours and 20 minutes. Done! Yield: About 6 cups

Here’s an added tip for successful rice cooking in the crock pot… Turn the crock pot off about 10 minutes early. Leave everything alone for the remaining time and the rice will finish cooking with the residual heat in the crock. This simple tip helps to keep the rice from sticking along the sides of the crock. Here’s a video on that…

Enjoy and I hope this helps!
Judi

EASY Raspberry Vinaigrette Salad Dressing

Here’s a simple recipe for a salad dressing I make for my husband VERY often. He loves it! I keep a bag of frozen raspberries in the freezer so they are handy whenever I need them.

I usually make up one serving at a time since it takes so little effort. The key is to get the raspberries out of the freezer before even starting to assemble your salad. Place what you need in a small bowl so they can thaw while you prepare your salad. By the time your salad is ready, the raspberries should be thawed and ready to be quickly made into a dressing. A link to my video on how I make this is above and the recipe is below.

Enjoy!
Judi

Raspberry Vinaigrette Salad Dressing
(One Serving)

1/4 cup frozen raspberries
1/4 to 1/3 tsp salt (or to taste)
1 tsp sugar (or to taste)
1 Tbsp red wine vinegar
2 Tbsp extra virgin olive oil

Place the frozen raspberries in a small bowl. Top with salt and sugar. Set the bowl aside to allow raspberries to thaw as you assemble your salad. When your salad is ready, finish making the dressing. The raspberries should be thawed by this time. Mash them up and stir in the salt and sugar with the spoon. Add the vinegar and oil; stir then drizzle over salad. Toss to combine. Enjoy!

Raspberry Vinaigrette Salad Dressing
(Makes Four Servings)

1 cup frozen raspberries
1 tsp salt, or to taste
4 tsp sugar, or to taste
1/4 cup red wine vinegar
1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil

Place the raspberries, salt and sugar in a container with a lid. Set it aside until the raspberries thaw. After the berries are thawed, mash the berries while mixing in the sugar and salt with a spoon. Add the vinegar and oil, cover the container, and shake until mixed. The oil will have a tendency to rise to the top…this is normal. Store in a covered container in the refrigerator. Use within a few days.

Easy Simple Rice Patties or Rice Cakes

Rice is a staple of many diets around the world. Now, with many Americans becoming sensitive or intolerant to gluten, rice dishes are increasing in popularity in the West. In an effort to develop something simple, like a bread substitute to have with a meal, or a ready-to-go easy snack, I developed this simple, easy to make, rice patty. The following is a video showing how to make them. See below the video for the recipe!

To make the rice patties, you will need cooked short grain rice of your choice. Leftover rice that was refrigerated, or freshly cooked rice may be used…

Simple Rice Patties
Makes about 12

1 cup short grain rice of choice (uncooked)
2 cups water (or amount needed according to package directions)
Salt and butter to taste, optional

Cook the rice according to package directions, adding salt and butter if desired. Allow the rice to cool just a little so you can work with it with your hands.

Form the patties: Measure out 1/4 to 1/3 cup of cooked rice and place the rice in a ring about 2-1/2 to 2-3/4 inches in diameter. With a spoon, compress the rice into the ring, then lift the ring away from the formed patty.

If you don’t have a ring, you could use a small can with both top and bottom removed. Alternatively, you could form the patties with your hands placing the sticky rice between two sheets of plastic wrap (it may be too sticky to form the patties with your bare hands).

With a small spatula, remove the formed patty to the appropriate tray or sheet, according to how they will be cooked. Place the formed patties either on a plate or tray (if sauteing them on the stove), on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper (if baking them in the oven), or on a fruit leather tray (if baking them in your dehydrator). Bake or saute according to directions below.

To cook them on the stove: Preheat a nonstick frying pan or cast iron skillet over medium heat. Add a little oil of your choice and briefly allow the oil to heat up. With a small spatula, carefully place the patties into the frying pan in the hot oil. Allow them to cook until the first side is golden brown. Carefully turn them over and allow the second side to brown. Then remove them to a serving tray and enjoy! If desired, they may be placed on paper towels to soak up any excess oil.

To bake them in a dehydrator: Place the formed patties on the fruit leather trays of your dehydrator. Bake at 145F for one hour, or until dry to the touch. Turn the patties over and continue cooking for another hour at the same temperature, until dry to the touch. The goal is to have them dry to the touch and easy to handle, but still moist inside. They should not be completely dried out in the process.

To bake them in your oven: Preheat your oven to its lowest temperature. Place the baking sheet with the formed patties on parchment paper on a rack in the middle of your oven. Allow them to bake until dry to the touch. Flip the patties over and continue baking them until the second side is dry to the touch. They should not be completely dried out…there should be moisture inside. The baking time will vary according to the temperature of your oven, so they will need to be monitored closely when baking these for the first time to determine the baking time needed with your specific oven.

Store your cooked patties in a covered container in the refrigerator. Enjoy them within 4 days.

Enjoy them as a bread substitute with a meal or a simple snack. They can be topped with softened butter, and eaten like that or even sprinkled with some herbs, or topped with a little nut butter and some jam or jelly, a little hummus, or eaten just plain. Use your imagination!

See also my original videos on how to make these delicious rice patties…

EASY Way to Dry Fresh Herbs

Many times we can end up with a bunch of fresh herbs, whether we grew them or not. Maybe a neighbor shared them. Maybe we bought them at the grocery store as a needed ingredient for some new recipe. Then we find ourselves with extra herbs, not knowing quite what to do with them. Sound familiar?

Well, drying fresh herbs doesn’t need to be hard. Nor do you need special equipment. Yes, it may be nice to dry them in a dehydrator, but not everyone owns one and it certainly isn’t worth buying one just to dry a few herbs! Some people suggest tying them by the stems and hanging them upside down to dry. That’s a tried and true time-honored method of drying herbs. However, even THAT can present itself with issues. What if you have no place to hang them? What if you have a cat that loves to attack them? What if the leaves fall off and make a mess on the floor?

Well, there’s an even easier way to dry those extra herbs. Simply wash them and pat them dry (if they have not already been washed). Then place them in a clean paper bag, stems and all. Leave the bag “puffed out” and fold over the top a couple times to keep the contents inside. Lay it on its side in a non-humid environment (someplace other than the kitchen or bathroom…who would want to dry food in a bathroom??). Next, a couple times a day (morning and evening), give the bag a little shake and turn it over. In a matter of days, your herbs will be beautifully dried. To remove the leaves from the stems, simply lightly crush them in your hands and remove the stems from there. Store the dried leaves in an air-tight covered container and use as you would any dried herb. It’s THAT simple!

The time it takes to dry your herbs will depend upon variables, such as the type of herb, the amount to be dried, the size of the bag, and the humidity in the environment. Nevertheless, they WILL dry, given a little time. AND this method involves no special equipment, no electricity, no mess to clean up during the process, no nails or hooks to hang them on. Just a paper bag! Note: Be sure it’s a paper bag, and not a plastic bag. The paper is needed for air flow in the drying process.

Below is a link to a video I produced showing how to do this. Enjoy!

I hope this helps 🙂
Judi

NEW Use for Juice Pulp…Salad Sprinkles

Many people are making fresh fruit and vegetable juice these days. And the trend is growing in popularity for good reason. It’s a GREAT way to add vital nutrients to your diet by increasing your consumption of those highly valued vegetables and fruit. But all that juicing leaves one with the question…What do I do with all this extracted pulp??

There are many websites, blog posts, and YouTube videos online showing the usual uses for the pulp: adding it to the compost pile, or make pulp crackers or vegetable broth. Those are all great ing suggestions and well worth trying. But I came up with yet another way to use the pulp that I haven’t seen before. Why not dehydrate it and use it for salad sprinkles?

Using the pulp for a salad sprinkle will not only add a little crunch to your salad and the flavored essence of the juiced vegetable or fruit, but it also adds the highly prized and much needed fiber that so many Western diets are lacking!

The pulp can be dehydrated and used just as it is…plain. OR, you could add any variety of herbs and spices that you want to flavor it your way according to your own liking. The flavoring options are limited only to your imagination.

Storing your salad sprinkles is simple. Just place them in an air-tight container and keep it somewhere where you won’t forget about it when it’s time to make a salad. Yes, placing an oxygen absorber in the container would also help to keep your sprinkles fresh, but if they’re used regularly, you’ll go through them quickly, so long-term storage probably won’t happen. Vacuum-sealing the container seems to be a waste of time and effort if you’ll be using the sprinkles regularly, so that shouldn’t be a concern. So, store them as you would homemade croutons and you should be good!

I created a video on making and storing dehydrated pulp to be used as salad sprinkles. Click the link below to view the video. Enjoy!

I hope this helps 🙂
Judi