Category Archives: Food

Apple Raisin Salad with Cashew Cream

Apple Raisin Salad with Cashew Cream

This is a new twist on the age-old familiar Apple Raisin Salad. Mayonnaise and traditional sour cream were replaced with freshly made cashew cream with a hint of orange in it. This salad is far better than the traditional one, with a rich and creamy dressing made from cashews. Below is a video demonstration of how the salad is made. The recipe is below the video.

Enjoy!
Judi

https://youtu.be/b6e25IyZ_dg

Apple Raisin Salad with Cashew Cream
Makes About 6 Servings

2 medium to large apples
1 cup chopped celery
1/3 cup chopped walnuts
¼ cup raisins

Cashew Cream:
1 cup raw cashews
2/3 cup filtered water
¼ tsp salt, or to taste
2 Tbsp fresh lemon juice, or to taste
1-1/2 to 2 Tbsp orange juice concentrate, or to taste (NOT diluted)

Make the Cashew Cream:
Place cashews in a bowl with enough water to cover them. Cover and place them in the refrigerator and allow them to soak overnight. Drain.

Place soaked and drained cashews in a blender with 2/3 cup water, and salt. Blend well, about 1 minute, until mixture is smooth and creamy. Add lemon juice and blend briefly to combine. Taste and add more salt and/or lemon juice, if needed. The mixture should taste like regular sour cream. Then stir in thawed orange juice concentrate (not diluted). This will give a fruitier flavor to the cream. Set it aside as you assemble the salad.

Make the salad:
Wash the apples and cut them into bite size pieces. Peeling the apples is optional. Add the celery, walnuts, and raisins. Toss to combine. Stir in the prepared cashew cream. (Use all the cream for a fully coated apple salad; use less for a less coated salad.) May be served right away, but for a sweeter and more “blended” flavor, place the salad in a covered container in the refrigerator for a few hours or overnight to allow the flavors to blend. Stir and enjoy!

Eggplant

Eggplant 101 – The Basics

If eggplant is new to you and you’re just not sure what to do with it, you’re in the right place! If you’re familiar with eggplant and are just looking for something a little different to do with it, you too are in the right place! My Eggplant 101 notes below cover everything from what it is, to how to select, store, freeze, and prepare eggplants, to what herbs, spices and other foods go well with them, along with cooking tips, ideas, and suggested recipes using eggplant. Enjoy!

I hope this helps!
Judi

Eggplant 101 – The Basics

About Eggplant
Eggplants are members of the nightshade (or Solanaceae) family, so they are cousins with tomatoes, bell peppers, and potatoes. They grow in a similar manner as tomatoes, on long vines producing hanging fruit. The flesh is glossy and usually deep purple in color, although other varieties can be lavender, jade green, orange, and yellow-white. The sizes of the different varieties can range from that of a small tomato, to a large, long zucchini, to a large oval teardrop, which is what we see most commonly in American grocery stores. The different varieties tend to have somewhat different textures and flavors when cooked ranging from very soft and creamy with a slight sweet flavor, to more meaty texture with a slight bitter flavor.

It appears that eggplant first grew wild in India, with cultivation beginning in China around 500 BC. From there it spread to Africa, then Italy, then eventually around the world. Because of its bitter nature, it was originally thought that eggplant caused insanity, leprosy and cancer. When it was first introduced to Europe, eggplant was used more as a decorative plant then as food. When newer varieties were cultivated with less bitterness, eggplant caught on more as a culinary delight. It is now an esteemed inclusion in the cuisines of Italy, Greece, Turkey, France, and beyond.

Nutrition Tidbits
Eggplant is noteworthy for its array of B-vitamins, fiber, copper, manganese, magnesium, potassium, folate, and Vitamin K. One cup of raw eggplant has only 20 calories.

Eggplants are high in the antioxidant nasunin, a type of anthocyanin, which is known to protect cells from harmful free radical damage. Some studies suggest that the antioxidants in eggplant may help to reduce our risk for heart disease by lowering LDL cholesterol and triglycerides. The fiber in eggplant may help to control blood sugar by slowing the rate of absorption. Limited research has shown that some of the compounds in eggplant may have cancer-fighting benefits.

How to Select Eggplant
Look for an eggplant that is firm and heavy for its size. The skin should be smooth, shiny, and have a deep color. Scars, bruises, and discoloration indicate older eggplants that may be decayed on the inside. If you gently press an indentation in the eggplant with your thumb and it springs back, the eggplant is ripe. If the indentation does not spring back, it is not ripe.

How to Store Eggplant
Eggplants are quite perishable. The optimal temperature for storing eggplant is 50-54°F. If you have someplace in your home at that temperature range, store it there. If your home is warmer than that (which is usually the case), store your eggplant loosely wrapped in a plastic bag (allowing some air to flow in and out) or crisper drawer in the refrigerator. Be sure to keep it away from ethylene-producing produce (such as apples, melons, avocados, bananas, and nectarines). Do not cut it until you are ready to use it.

How to Freeze Eggplant
Eggplant can be frozen, but the texture will be very soft when it is thawed. This would be fine if using it for dips, sauces or soups. For this purpose, eggplant can be water blanched in the traditional method. Wash and peel your eggplant and slice it or cut it into desired size pieces. Add ½ cup of lemon juice to 1 gallon of water. Bring to a boil and add the eggplant. Boil for 4 minutes, drain, then cool in ice water. Drain and place in air-tight freezer bags or containers.

Roasted eggplant can also be frozen. Wash the eggplant and poke some holes in it with a fork. Roast at 400°F until it collapses. Remove from oven and allow it to cool so it can be handled. Scoop out the pulp and place it in an air-tight freezer container to freeze.

If you plan to fry eggplant after removing it from the freezer, slice and blanch the eggplant. Then batter or bread it as if it were fresh. Freeze slices separately on a tray, then transfer them to air-tight freezer containers, separating layers with waxed paper.

Completely cooked dishes using eggplant can also be frozen. Freeze them in serving-size portions in appropriate air-tight containers.

Properly prepared eggplant can keep in the freezer for 6 to 8 months.

How to Prepare Eggplant
First wash the eggplant, then cut the ends off. Eggplant will turn dark quickly after being cut. To help prevent that or at least slow it down, sprinkle it with a little lemon juice.

Many people eat eggplant with the skin left on, while others opt to peel it first. Note that the skin of larger specimens and those with white skin will be tougher, so it is advisable to peel those. Slice or cut the eggplant into desired size pieces. To help reduce bitterness, salt both sides of cut slices and allow them to sit and “sweat” for about 20 minutes. Then rinse well and proceed with recipe. Note: Use salt sparingly in recipes when preparing eggplant that has been salted to sweat out the bitterness, in case not all of the salt was rinsed off. More salt can always be added later, but removing too much is a different story! Taste it along the way to be sure.

Cooking/Serving Ideas and Tips
Eggplant can be baked, roasted, steamed, fried, stuffed, grilled, pureed, used in casseroles and soups, and incorporated into a variety of ethnic cuisines.

Quick ideas and tips for using eggplant:

* Puree roasted eggplant with garlic, tahini, lemon juice, cumin, and olive oil for homemade Baba Ganoush, a Middle Eastern thick sauce or spread. (See link below for recipe.)

* Eggplant may be roasted whole. To do this, do not peel the eggplant. Pierce the skin several times with a fork to make vent holes to allow steam to escape. Bake at 400°F for 15 to 25 minutes, depending on its size. It is done when you can easily poke a fork or sharp knife in it, or when it collapses.

* Combine baked eggplant cubes with peppers, lentils, onions, and garlic then top with a balsamic vinaigrette.

* Eggplant is like a sponge, so it absorbs oil very quickly when pan-frying. To help minimize this, salt the cubed eggplant and let it rest in a colander for 30 minutes. Rinse well, then squeeze dry between two sheets of paper towel. Salting the eggplant will remove its moisture and pressing it will compact the eggplant making it meatier and less absorbent.

* The longer the eggplant is cooked, the softer it will become.

* To grill eggplant, cut off the stem end, then cut in 1½ inch-thick wedges. Grill until streaked with brown and tender when pierced (12 to 15 minutes).

Herbs/Spices That Go Well With Eggplant
Basil, bay leaf, capers, cardamom, chervil, cilantro, cinnamon, coriander, cumin, curry powder, dill, fennel seeds, fenugreek, garlic, ginger, lemongrass, mace, marjoram, mint, nutmeg, orange, oregano, paprika and smoked paprika, parsley, pepper, rosemary, saffron, sage, salt, savory, tarragon, thyme, and turmeric

Other Foods That Go Well With Eggplant
Proteins, Nuts, Seeds: Anchovies, beans, beef, cashews, chicken, chickpeas, eggs, lamb, lentils, nuts, peanuts and peanut sauce, pine nuts, pork, sausage, seitan, sesame seeds, shrimp, tahini, tofu, and walnuts

Vegetables: Artichoke hearts, arugula, bell peppers, bok choy, carrots, celery, chard, chiles, kohlrabi, mushrooms, olives, onions, potatoes, radicchio, scallions, shallots, spinach, sprouts, tomatoes, and zucchini

Fruit: Coconut, lemon, lime, orange, pomegranate, and raisins

Grains: Bread crumbs, bulgur, couscous, millet, noodles, pasta, polenta, quinoa, and rice

Dairy and Non-Dairy: Cheese (esp. mozzarella, Parmesan, ricotta), coconut milk, cream, milk, and yogurt

Other: Hoisin, honey, miso, oil (esp. olive, sesame), pesto, sake, soy sauce, stock (vegetable), tamari, and vinegar

Eggplant has been used in: African cuisines, Asian cuisines, Baba Ganoush, caponata, casseroles, Chinese cuisine, curries, eggplant Parmesan, eggplant rollatini, stuffed eggplant, French cuisine, gratins, Indian cuisine, Italian cuisine, Japanese cuisine, Mediterranean cuisines, Middle Eastern cuisines, Moroccan cuisine, moussaka, pasta dishes, pesto, pizza, ratatouille, risotto, salads, sandwiches, Southeast Asian cuisines, spreads, stews, stir-fries, tagines, and Thai cuisine

Suggested Flavor Combos:
Combine eggplant with…
Balsamic vinegar + basil + oregano
Balsamic vinegar + tomatoes + zucchini
Basil + ricotta + tomatoes
Bell peppers + garlic
Bell peppers + onions + tomatoes + zucchini
Cheese (mozzarella, Parmesan, ricotta) + tomatoes
Chickpeas + tomatoes + pomegranate molasses
Cucumbers + garlic + mint + yogurt
Dill + walnuts + yogurt
Feta cheese + mint
Garlic + ginger + scallions + sesame + sesame oil + soy sauce
Garlic + lemon + olive oil + tahini
Garlic + Parmesan cheese + parsley + ricotta + tomatoes
Garlic + tomatoes + zucchini
Herbs + lemon juice + olive oil
Pasta + pesto + ricotta + walnuts

Recipe Links
The Original Arabic Moutabal (Baba Ganoush) https://maninio.com/the-original-arabic-moutabal-baba-ganoush-middle-east-vegan/

Vegetarian Baked Eggplant “Meatballs”
https://thefreerangelife.com/baked-eggplant-balls/

50+ Delicious Eggplant Recipes for Every Taste https://thefreerangelife.com/eggplant-recipes/

Spicy Garlic Oven Roasted Eggplant Slices https://www.melaniecooks.com/spicy-garlic-roasted-eggplant/

12 Eggplant Recipes That Prove There is Life Beyond Eggplant Parm https://www.thekitchn.com/12-eggplant-recipes-that-prove-there-is-life-beyond-eggplant-parm-232650

18 of the Easiest-Ever Eggplant Recipes https://www.realsimple.com/food-recipes/recipe-collections-favorites/popular-ingredients/easy-eggplant-recipes

Eggplant and Black Bean Casserole https://producemadesimple.ca/eggplant-and-black-bean-casserole/

Eggplant Dip (Baba Ganoush) https://producemadesimple.ca/eggplant-dip-baba-ganoush/

Eggplant Stackers https://producemadesimple.ca/eggplant-stackers/

Resources
http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=foodspice&dbid=22

https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/eggplant-benefits

https://thefreerangelife.com/how-to-store-eggplant/

https://www.hgtv.com/outdoors/gardens/garden-to-table/freezing-eggplant

https://producemadesimple.ca/eggplant/

Page, Karen. (2014) The Vegetarian Flavor Bible. New York, NY: Little, Brown and Company.

Cashew Cream

If you’re dairy intolerant or are trying to cut back on animal fats, cashew cream is an excellent substitute for dairy sour cream. It’s easy to make, tastes just like dairy sour cream, and can be used any way regular sour cream can be used. If you haven’t tried it, give it a try! It’s well worth a taste!

Below is a video where I demonstrate how to make cashew cream. The recipe is below the video.

Enjoy!
Judi

Cashew Cream
Makes ½ to 2/3 cup of a Sour Cream Substitute

½ cup raw cashews
1/3 cup filtered water
1/8 tsp salt, or to taste
1 Tbsp fresh lemon juice, or to taste

Place cashews in a small bowl with enough water to cover them. Cover and place them in the refrigerator and allow them to soak overnight. Drain.

Place soaked and drained cashews in a blender with water, and a small amount of salt (only a pinch or two). Blend well, about 1 minute, until mixture is smooth and creamy. Add lemon juice and blend briefly to combine. Taste and add more salt and/or lemon juice, if needed. The mixture should taste like regular sour cream.

Use as you would any sour cream. Store any leftover in a covered container in the refrigerator, and use within 2 days. If you need more cashew cream, the recipe can easily be doubled.

Note: If you want a thicker cream, simply use less water. Use more water if you want a thinner cream.

Package of Lundberg Wild Blend Rice

Review of Lundberg Wild Blend Rice

I did an unbiased review of Lundberg Family Farms’ Wild Blend Rice. It’s a combination of long grain brown rice, sweet brown rice, wild rice, Wehani red rice, and black rice. It’s 100 percent whole grain with nothing else added. I spotted this on one trip to the grocery store and decided to give it a try. The video below is my first encounter with this special blend of grains. My notes on the review follow the video link.

If you have not tried this blend of rice, let me encourage you to give it a try. It’s different than plain rice, with a bit of an “earthy” flavor from the wild rice in the mix.

I hope this helps!
Judi

Review of Lundberg Wild Blend Rice

Note: I have no official ties with Lundberg Family Farms. I purchased the rice package with my own funds and have not been prompted in any way by the company to do a review of this nor any of their products. This is an unbiased review.

A package of Lundberg Wild Blend Rice was purchased. One cup of the blend, plus one tablespoon of butter (a suggested optional ingredient in the instructions) was cooked according to package directions, with 1-3/4 cups of water. The following are the results.

Cooking Time: The package directions state to bring everything to a boil, then lower the heat, and cook the blend at a simmer for 45 minutes in a pot with a tight-fitting lid. The package directions state to use either water or broth. I opted for water so I would have no added flavoring which might skew my taste perception of the blend. I added the amount of water called for in the recipe, which was 1-3/4 cups. At 35 minutes into the cooking time, I noticed that the water was all absorbed. I tasted the rice for texture and it was a little chewy, but done enough for me (I don’t want my rice to be mushy). The package directions state that if the rice is not soft enough when the cooking time is up, to add one or two tablespoons more of the liquid and continue cooking. I opted to not do this. At the 35 minute mark, I removed the pot from the heat and allowed the rice to finish the “steaming” process for another 10 minutes, as per the instructions.

Cooked Lundberg Wild Blend Rice

Cooked Lundberg Wild Blend Rice

When finished, the rice was slightly chewy and cooked enough (it was not hard inside). Again, it was cooked enough for me. It was not mushy, which I prefer.

Options and Comments: I could have added a little more liquid at the 35 minute point, or even added a couple tablespoons more liquid in the beginning. In all fairness to Lundberg, I have an electric stove and it took a little while for the temperature to lower from a hard boil to a slow simmer. This may have caused extra water to evaporate that may have been needed in the cooking process. Bear this in mind if you use an electric range. The heat on a gas range would have been lowered much faster, possibly resulting in needing the full cooking time without extra liquid, as per the instructions.

Flavor: The rice blend had a good flavor; but as rice can be, it was a little bland. The wild rice in the blend gave it a bit of an “earthy” flavor. I can see where the flavor would have been enhanced by some salt being added in the beginning, OR by using a vegetable broth instead of the water. Either option would have enhanced the flavor just enough to make it a very tasty side dish on its own.

Options and Comments: After tasting the rice blend without added flavorings, I could easily see how some added onions, garlic, bell pepper, and seasonings would make it an absolutely delicious side dish that would pair well with many foods. I will be doing some experimenting with this blend, keeping these things in mind!

When I cook the blend in the future, I will add a little salt into the cooking water, if not using vegetable stock with salt already in it. This should help to bring out the natural nutty flavor of the various grains in the blend.

Would I recommend this product? Yes. If you enjoy rice and are looking for something a little different than plain rice, this would be a fine option. I suggest you flavor it any way you would normally flavor rice that you enjoy. The addition of the wild rice in this blend gives it a little different flavor than that of plain rice.

Meatless Burgers

Meatless Burgers

Here’s a recipe for a meatless burger than I’ve been making for years. It’s flavorful and a very flexible recipe. You can use any type of bean or legume you want and the flavorings are easy to adjust to your preferences. Give it a try! The recipe is below the video demonstration. Enjoy!

I hope this helps!
Judi

https://youtu.be/iXLysvJ47Bs

Meatless Burgers
Makes about 6 Patties

2 cups COOKED beans of choice* (or 1 (15 oz) can of beans of choice, rinsed and drained)
½ cup quick oats (dry, not cooked)**
2 tsp garlic powder (or 8 small cloves of fresh garlic)
1-1/2 Tbsp dried parsley flakes
1 tsp dried oregano
1-1/2 to 2 Tbsp dried minced onion (or ¾ to 1 cup diced fresh onion)
¼ tsp black pepper
½ tsp salt
1 cup cooked rice of choice
1 small can (6 oz) tomato paste
¼ cup + 2 Tbsp water, or as needed
1 to 2 Tbsp extra virgin olive oil

Place cooked beans in a food processor and process until the beans are somewhat broken up (it does not need to be perfectly smooth like hummus); set aside.

Place the oats, garlic, parsley, oregano, onion, pepper and salt in a large bowl; stir to combine. Add the cooked rice and stir to combine. Stir in the processed beans and the tomato paste; combine well. Add water as needed to make the mixture the texture and thickness of a raw ground beef mixture, and ingredients are moist and hold well together, but not soggy wet. If needed, add a little water (1 or 2 tablespoons at a time) to help the mixture to blend better. It needs to be moist enough to hold together, while being a little soft, but not so wet that patties won’t hold together or are sticky to handle. If the mixture is too moist, add a little more oats to the mixture and allow it to rest a few minutes so the oats can soak up the extra moisture.

Divide the mixture into ½ cup portions and form patties. If there is a little extra, just add it to the patties already made if it’s not enough for a whole patty.

Heat a large skillet over medium heat. Add 1 to 2 Tbsp extra virgin olive oil and allow it to heat briefly. Carefully place the patties in the skillet. Lower the heat to medium-low and allow them to brown on the first side as they begin to firm up on the inside. If they are browning too fast where the inside is still very soft and the outside is too brown, reduce the heat on the stove a little more. When the patties are golden brown on the first side, carefully turn them and allow the second side to brown. The patties are done when they feel firm to the touch and both sides are browned, about 20 to 30 minutes depending upon how hot the skillet is. It is fine to flip the burgers more than once if needed. Serve immediately as you would any burger patty. Store extra patties covered in the refrigerator and use within 4 or 5 days.

* Literally any bean or legume (or any combination) can work in this recipe. Whatever you have on hand and want to use is fine. Canned, freshly cooked, or cooked and frozen can all be used in this recipe. If you have cooked and frozen beans, be sure to thaw them first.

** Old fashioned rolled oats can also be used, but place them in a food processor and pulse it a few times to break the oats up before using them.

About Judi
Julia W. Klee (Judi) began her journey enjoying “all things food” in elementary school when she started preparing meals for her family. That love of food blossomed into a quest to learn more and more about health and wellness as related to nutrition. She went on to earn a BS Degree in Food and Nutrition, then an MS Degree in Nutrition. She has taught nutrition and related courses at the college level to pre-nursing and exercise science students. Her hunger to learn didn’t stop upon graduation from college. She continues to research on a regular basis about nutrition as it relates to health. Her hope is to help as many people as possible to enjoy foods that promote health and wellness.

Asparagus

Asparagus 101 – The Basics

If you need to know something about asparagus, you’re in the right place! Below is a lot of information from what asparagus is and how it grows to suggested recipe links and everything in between. I hope this helps!

Enjoy,
Judi

Asparagus 101 – The Basics

About Asparagus
Asparagus spears, as we find them in grocery stores, are actually young shoots of a plant that (if not harvested) would grow into a large fern-like structure. Most asparagus commonly sold in the United States is green. In Europe, asparagus is usually grown in a different manner yielding a white, mild flavored variety of the plant. Creative farmers have recently learned how to cultivate a purple variety of asparagus that is starting to be found in some grocery stores.

Asparagus is native to Africa, Asia and Europe. Over time, it spread to North and South America, New Zealand, and Australia. China, Peru and Mexico currently produce most of the world’s asparagus crop. Most of the asparagus grown in the United States is produced in California, Washington and Michigan.

Nutrition Tidbits
Asparagus is an excellent source of Vitamin K, assorted B-Vitamins, copper, selenium, and Vitamins C and E. It is also a good source of fiber and other vitamins and minerals including manganese, calcium, potassium, phosphorus, iron, magnesium, and zinc. Of course, being a plant food, it has no cholesterol. One cup of raw asparagus has a mere 27 calories.

Some people express concern about a particular odor in their urine after eating asparagus. This is nothing to be concerned about. It’s actually due to the breakdown of a particular antioxidant in asparagus that has numerous health benefits, especially in aerobic metabolism. In fact, researchers have identified almost 100 different phytonutrients in asparagus that make this vegetable a unique nutritional workhorse, unlike any other. The antioxidants in asparagus make it a powerful anti-inflammatory food.

How to Select Asparagus
When shopping for asparagus, look for firm, brightly colored stalks. Opt for thinner stalks because they are more tender than the thicker ones. Choose stalks with closed and deeply colored tips as they will be fresher. Also, opt for ones with less woody, tough stems so there will be less to discard when you prepare them.

How to Store Asparagus
Store asparagus in the refrigerator and use it as soon as possible after bringing it home. There are two suggested ways to store asparagus while in the refrigerator: (1) Wrap the ends in a damp paper towel, or (2) Stand the stalks upright in a container wide enough to hold them. Add enough water to allow the bottoms of all the stalks to rest in about one inch of water. The upper stalks may be loosely covered with a plastic bag. Change the water if it starts to look cloudy.

How to Freeze Asparagus
To freeze asparagus, wash it, then remove the woody ends and cut it into desired lengths. Blanch it in boiling water for 1 to 3 minutes, depending on the thickness of the stalks and length of the pieces. If steam-blanching is preferred, place the asparagus pieces in a steamer basket over boiling water. Cover with a tight-fitting lid and allow to steam for 3 to 6 minutes, depending on the thickness and length of the stalk pieces.

Immediately transfer the blanched asparagus to a bowl of ice water and allow it to cool completely. Drain and place the asparagus in an air-tight freezer container.* It may be stored in the freezer for 8 to 12 months. It is not mandatory to thaw the asparagus pieces before cooking.

* To keep the pieces from bunching up and freezing into one big lump, you could place your blanched and drained asparagus pieces on a tray. Place the tray in the freezer for one or two hours until the asparagus pieces are frozen. Then transfer them to a container or freezer bag for storage in the freezer.

Blanching vegetables before storing them in the freezer is an important step in stopping the enzyme activity which will continue to age them even in the freezer. Some people choose to freeze vegetables without blanching them first. If you opt to do this, be sure to label them with the date and use them within four to six weeks. Beyond that, they will start to deteriorate with changes in color, texture, and flavor.

Fresh vs Frozen vs Canned
Asparagus is available canned, frozen and fresh in most grocery stores. As is the case with most vegetables, fresh is best with regard to flavor, aroma, texture, and nutritional value. Frozen vegetables are a close second choice with regard to those same aspects and are a wonderful convenience when fresh is not available or you are short on prep time in the kitchen. Canned asparagus spears are found year-round in most grocery stores and can be a good staple food to have available in a pinch. Since the canning process actually cooks vegetables along the way, canned asparagus spears are extremely tender and will not have the crispness of fresh or even frozen asparagus pieces. They simply need to be briefly heated and are ready to serve. However nutritionally speaking, the canned variety comes in last on the list.

How is asparagus usually eaten…raw or cooked?
Asparagus is usually cooked before being eaten; however, the thinner, tender stalks can be enjoyed raw. They can be a nice crunchy addition to a green salad.

How to Prepare Asparagus
Of course, give your asparagus a good wash first. Some people will opt to peel the bottom portion of the asparagus stalks with a vegetable peeler if they are thick and somewhat woody, although this is not mandatory. Cut or break off the woody area toward the bottom of the stalks, and discard or save them for stock. Cut the remaining portion into desired lengths or leave whole.

Cooking/Serving Ideas
Asparagus can be boiled, steamed, sautéed, roasted, pickled, grilled, and included in frittatas, omelets, soups, and stir-fries. Thin, tender stalks can be eaten raw. Most importantly, asparagus cooks up and becomes soft quickly, so less is best when working with asparagus. Thinner stalks take less time to cook than thicker ones, so this is important when determining cooking times.

To boil asparagus, bring water to a boil in a skillet or saucepan. Add prepared asparagus to the pan and boil for 5 to 7 minutes, or until as tender as desired.

To microwave your asparagus, place your prepared asparagus pieces into a microwave-safe dish. Add 2 tablespoons of water, cover, and microwave on high for 4 to 6 minutes, rearranging spears midway to allow them all to cook evenly.

To steam asparagus, lay the stalks in a steamer basket over boiling water. Cover and steam for 5 to 7 minutes, until crisp-tender.

To stir-fry asparagus, cut it into one-inch pieces, and stir-fry it in a wok or skillet with 1 or 2 tablespoons of butter or oil, for 5 to 7 minutes.

To roast asparagus, arrange prepared stalks in a single layer in a large shallow baking pan. Drizzle with 1 or 2 tablespoons of olive oil and sprinkle with salt and pepper. Roast at 425°F for 10 to 15 minutes, until tender, but firm to the bite.

To BBQ asparagus, follow the same preparation method as roasting (above), but lay the asparagus spears on aluminum foil on the BBQ grill.

Quick Ideas for Using Asparagus:

* When cooking asparagus, remove it from the heat a minute or so before you think it is done. It will continue to cook briefly after being removed from the heat.

* Add cooked, cold asparagus to your favorite green salad.

* Add asparagus to your favorite omelet.

* Add asparagus to cooked pasta dressed with some olive oil, herbs and Parmesan cheese.

* Sauté asparagus with garlic, onions, mushrooms, and beans, tofu or chicken. Serve over a bed of rice.

* Save freshly cooked leftover asparagus for use the next day in an egg, pasta, or rice dish.

* Cook asparagus in your favorite way and top it with a little vinaigrette dressing.

* Marinate asparagus with teriyaki sauce, then grill it and sprinkle with sesame seeds.

Herbs/Spices That Go Well With Asparagus
Basil, bay leaf, capers, chervil, chili paste and chili pepper flakes, chives, cilantro, dill, fennel seeds, garlic, ginger, hoisin sauce, hollandaise sauce, horseradish, mint, miso, mustard (Dijon), nutmeg, parsley, pepper, rosemary, sage, salt, sorrel, soy sauce, tarragon, thyme

Other Foods That Go Well With Asparagus

Proteins, Nuts, Seeds: Bacon, beans, eggs, nuts, peanuts and peanut sauce, pine nuts, prosciutto, salmon, sesame, tofu

Vegetables: Artichokes and artichoke hearts, arugula, bell peppers, corn, fennel, greens (salad), leeks, mushrooms, onions, peas, potatoes, shallots, spinach, tomatoes, watercress

Fruits: Avocado, lemon, lime, olives (black), orange

Grains: Bread crumbs, noodles, pasta, polenta, quinoa, rice, whole grains (ie barley, couscous, farro)

Dairy and Non-Dairy: Butter and browned butter, cheese, cream, cream cheese, crème fraiche, Parmesan cheese, yogurt

Other: Honey, mayonnaise, oil, vinaigrette, vinegar, wine (dry white)

Asparagus has been used in: Custards, French cuisine, pizza, quiche, risotto, salads, soufflés, stir-fries, sushi (vegetarian), and tarts (vegetable)

Suggested Flavor Combos:
Pair asparagus with…
Avocado + lime + mint + olive oil
Basil + olives
Bell peppers + eggs + garlic + lemon juice + thyme
Citrus + garlic + herbs (ie parsley, tarragon) + olive oil
Couscous + orange
Fava beans + mint
Garlic + ginger + scallions + sesame + sesame oil + soy sauce + vinegar
Ginger + hoisin sauce + sesame oil + soy sauce
Goat cheese + lemon + olive oil + pistachios
Hazelnuts + Parmesan cheese + parsley
Lemon + Parmesan + risotto
Lemon + pecans + rice
Onions + orange
Sesame + tofu

Recipe Links
Mediterranean Pasta Salad http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=recipe&dbid=152

Warm Asparagus Salad http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=recipe&dbid=188

5-Minute Healthy Sautéed Asparagus http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=recipe&dbid=296

Garlic Shrimp Salad http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=recipe&dbid=84

15-Minute Healthy Sautéed Chicken and Asparagus http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=recipe&dbid=139

How to Cook Asparagus in the Oven https://www.thekitchn.com/how-to-cook-asparagus-in-the-oven-cooking-lessons-from-the-kitchn-202675

Asparagus, Prosciutto, and Goat Cheese Frittata https://producemadesimple.ca/asparagus-prosciutto-and-goat-cheese-frittata/

Asparagus and Mushroom Tart https://producemadesimple.ca/ontario-asparagus-mushroom-tart/

Breaded Asparagus Spears with Smoked Maple Bacon Dip https://producemadesimple.ca/breaded-asparagus-spears-smoked-maple-bacon-dip/

Asparagus and Cheese Quiches https://producemadesimple.ca/ontario-asparagus-cheese-quiches/

Asparagus Penne Bake https://producemadesimple.ca/ontario-asparagus-penne-bake/

Shaved Asparagus Salad https://producemadesimple.ca/shaved-asparagus-salad/

77 Healthy Ways to Cook With Asparagus https://www.cookinglight.com/food/in-season/cooking-with-asparagus

The 16 Most Delicious Things You Can Do To Asparagus https://www.self.com/gallery/the-most-delicious-things-you-can-do-to-asparagus

30+ Amazing Asparagus Recipes https://www.afamilyfeast.com/asparagus-recipes/

33 Asparagus Recipes for Salad, Pasta, Grilling, and More https://www.bonappetit.com/recipes/slideshow/asparagus-recipes

26 Amazing Asparagus Recipes https://cooking.nytimes.com/68861692-nyt-cooking/999915-26-amazing-asparagus-recipes

About Judi
Julia W. Klee (Judi) began her journey enjoying “all things food” in elementary school when she started preparing meals for her family. That love of food blossomed into a quest to learn more and more about health and wellness as related to nutrition. She went on to earn a BS Degree in Food and Nutrition, then an MS Degree in Nutrition. She has taught nutrition and related courses at the college level to pre-nursing and exercise science students. Her hunger to learn didn’t stop upon graduation from college. She continues to research on a regular basis about nutrition as it relates to health. Her hope is to help as many people as possible to enjoy foods that promote health and wellness.

Resources
https://www.thespruceeats.com/all-about-asparagus-2215775

http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=foodspice&dbid=12

https://www.livestrong.com/article/514845-the-best-way-to-freeze-asparagus-blanch-it-or-just-freeze-it/

https://www.thekitchn.com/the-best-way-to-store-asparagus-203442

https://producemadesimple.ca/asparagus/

https://producemadesimple.ca/savoury-asparagus-recipes-spring/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26592472

Page, Karen. (2014) The Vegetarian Flavor Bible. New York, NY: Little, Brown and Company.

Cucumber Tomato Salad with Dill

Easy Cucumber Tomato Salad with Dill

This simple salad is easy and fast to make, and oh so delicious! It can be made ahead of time, since marinating for a while in the refrigerator allows the flavors to blend, making it that much tastier. Click the video link for a demonstration on making the salad. The recipe is below the video. Enjoy!

I hope this helps!
Judi

Cucumber Tomato Salad with Dill
Makes About 4 Servings

1 cucumber
2 Roma tomatoes
2 scallions, or 1/3 to ½ cup chopped onion of choice
2 Tbsp extra virgin olive oil
1 Tbsp apple cider vinegar or fresh lemon juice
1/2 tsp dried dill weed (or ½ Tbsp fresh dill weed), or more if desired
Salt to taste

Cut cucumber (peeling is optional), tomatoes, and scallion into bite-size pieces and place in a serving bowl. Top with the olive oil, vinegar or lemon juice, dried dill weed and salt. Toss to combine. Serve or cover and refrigerate until needed.

This salad can be allowed to marinade in a covered container in the refrigerator for up to 24 hours. This gives time for the flavors to blend. It is delicious served immediately but is even better when made in advance.

About Judi
Julia W. Klee (Judi) began her journey enjoying “all things food” in elementary school when she started preparing meals for her family. That love of food blossomed into a quest to learn more and more about health and wellness as related to nutrition. She went on to earn a BS Degree in Food and Nutrition, then an MS Degree in Nutrition. She has taught nutrition and related courses at the college level to pre-nursing and exercise science students. Her hunger to learn didn’t stop upon graduation from college. She continues to research on a regular basis about nutrition as it relates to health. Her hope is to help as many people as possible to enjoy foods that promote health and wellness.

Mangos

Mangos 101 – The Basics

If you haven’t tried a mango, let me personally invite you to venture into this delicious taste sensation. Ripe mangos are sweet, juicy, and delicious. They are similar to ripe peaches and can often be used interchangeably in recipes calling for peaches. Many people are not aware that you can also eat unripe mangos. The unripe fruit has a peppery flavor and can easily be used in savory dishes where a peppery flare is welcomed.

If you’re new to mangos, the information below should help you out. If you’re already familiar with mangos, yet are looking for something different to do with them, you’re in the right place! There is a LOT of information on what to do with mangos! I hope this helps!

Enjoy,
Judi

Mangos 101 – The Basics

About Mangos
Mangos are a popular fruit around the world. Botanically, it’s a drupe, with an outer skin, an edible pulp, and a central stone that houses a single seed. Peaches and plums are also drupes. Mangos are fruits of an evergreen tree in the cashew family. There are over 1,000 different varieties of mangos, with some being round while others are oval.

Mangos were first grown in India over 5,000 years ago. From there, mangos were slowly introduced around the world. Spanish explorers brought mangos to South America and Mexico in the 1600s. Mangos were first introduced to America in 1833 when they were brought to Florida. In India, a basket of mangos is considered to be a sign of friendship, with the mango itself being a symbol of love.

Nutrition Tidbits
One cup of mango meets 100% of our recommended amount of Vitamin C and about a third that of Vitamin A. Mangos also supply fiber, folate, Vitamin B6, copper, Vitamin K and potassium. They have no cholesterol, sodium nor fat. One cup of mango has about 100 calories.

How to Choose a Mango
Color is not always the best indicator of ripeness with mangos. A ripe mango will give a little when squeezed, like a peach or avocado. A red color will appear on some varieties of ripe mangos, but not all. Also, a fruity aroma can be detected at the stem end of many (but not all) varieties of mangos. With all things considered, the squeeze test is the best way to determine if a mango is ripe.

Avoid mangos with bruises or shriveled skin. Those are past their prime and are not the best selections.

Unripe mangos are very edible, but are not sweet. They have somewhat of a peppery flavor and can be used in savory applications. Ripe mangos are deliciously sweet and are used in most recipes calling for mango as a sweet fruit.

How to Ripen and Store a Mango
Store unripe mangos at room temperature. Green mangos will ripen at room temperature over several days. To hasten ripening, place green mangos in a paper bag kept at room temperature.

To slow down the ripening process, store ripe mangos in the refrigerator for up to five days. Storing mangos too long in the refrigerator will cause them to turn black.

Peeled and cubed mango may be stored in an airtight container in the refrigerator for several days or in the freezer for up to six months.

How to Cut a Mango
First wash your mango. The peel will need to be removed as it can cause irritation in the mouth. The stone inside needs to be removed. It is large and somewhat flattened. Observe how the mango lays on your counter. It will position itself so the stone is parallel with the counter. Stand the mango up on the stem end and slice it parallel to the stone on each side of the stone. Then make narrow slices down the sides of the mango along the wide side of the stone. If your knife hits the stone in the process, simply move the knife outward just a bit and try again.

After removing the stone, with a knife cut away the peel, then slice or cube the mango as needed. Sometimes, the peel of very ripe mango slices can simply be peeled back with fingers and removed that way. The flesh of ripe mango can be very slippery to handle, so use caution when slicing it so you don’t cut yourself.

One large mango may yield up to two cups of mango cubes.

Important note! Mango juice can stain clothes, so take precaution when preparing it.

Serving Ideas
Mangos are usually eaten fresh, but there are some recipes available where creative individuals have incorporated them into baked goods, pies, mousses, curries, cobblers, and crisps (see recipe links below!). They may also be grilled or roasted.

Here are some quick ideas for including mango into your day:

* Serve mango cubes with your favorite yogurt.

* Make popsicles with pureed mango.

* Top pancakes or waffles with cut mango, then drizzle with maple syrup. Yum!

* Include mango in a breakfast smoothie.

* Drizzle pureed mango over cooked chicken, fish, or pork.

* Include cubed mango in a fruit or green salad.

* Mangos can be used in place of peaches in recipes.

* Add fresh ripe mango to a spinach salad.

* Top baked or grilled salmon with mango salsa.

Herbs/Spices That Go Well With Mangos
Basil, cardamom, cayenne, cilantro, cinnamon, cloves, coriander, cumin, fenugreek, garlic, ginger, lavender, mint, oregano, paprika, parsley, salt, star anise, vanilla, vinegar

Foods That Go Well With Mango
Proteins, Nuts and Seeds: Almonds, beans, cashews, chicken, chickpeas, duck, fish, legumes, nuts, peanuts, pork, sesame, tempeh, tofu

Fruit: Avocado, banana, berries, coconut, kiwi, lemon, lime, melon, nectarines, orange, papayas, passion fruit, peaches, pears, pineapple, plantains, tamarind, tropical fruits

Vegetables: Arugula, bell peppers, chayote squash, chiles, corn, cucumbers, fennel, jalapenos, jicama, lettuce, red onions, rhubarb, scallions, seaweed, shallots, snow peas, tomatillos, tomatoes

Grains: Corn, noodles (esp. Asian), quinoa, rice, tortillas

Dairy and Non-Dairy: Almond milk, coconut milk, cream, ice cream, yogurt

Other: Honey, rum, sugar, tapioca, wine

Suggested Flavor Combos:
Mango + avocado + chiles + cilantro + lime + onions + vinegar
Mango + bananas + honey + lime juice + orange juice
Mango + beans + cilantro + lime + onions
Mango + bell peppers + cilantro + lime
Mango + cardamom + honey + yogurt
Mango + chiles + cilantro + lime + red onions
Mango + chiles + cumin + garlic + lime + orange
Mango + coconut milk + sticky rice
Mango + honey + mint + yogurt
Mango + honey + orange juice + yogurt
Mango + lime + mint + orange + papaya
Mango + lime + raspberries + vanilla
Mango + peach + raspberries

Types of dishes and cuisines that mangos are often included in:
Beverages, chutneys, coulis (a thin sauce), crepes, curry, desserts (ie. Cheesecake), Indian cuisine, lassis (a sweet or savory Indian beverage), Mexican cuisine, puddings, salads, sauces, smoothies, soups (ie fruit soup), stir-fries, tarts

Recipe Links
Jicama Mango Carrot Salad https://youtu.be/2LTb5QeLjfY

25 Mango Recipes You Need to Try https://www.huffpost.com/entry/mango-recipes-dessert_n_1432676?guccounter=1&guce_referrer=aHR0cHM6Ly93d3cuZ29vZ2xlLmNvbS8&guce_referrer_sig=AQAAAIGcJP1n1Ri5h0Iq2Dv1bKBU9oTDNqgBDRPzkVg0qQ-8zf5i6rplqWCAkCrwosqCg2n-nEHCGmA8lDS-8nGSftRRNKfX2nVVmVgE7m9wmD5CzxR9TAkTIqR8UOF504szPGcqjEysfxKxyKttc786iKIELtom6PJpxgZn1X7dZ4RW

Easy Mango Banana Smoothie https://www.allrecipes.com/recipe/231851/easy-mango-banana-smoothie/?internalSource=streams&referringId=16131&referringContentType=Recipe%20Hub&clickId=st_trending_b

Quick Mango Salsa https://www.allrecipes.com/recipe/217283/quick-mango-salsa/?internalSource=streams&referringId=17193&referringContentType=Recipe%20Hub&clickId=st_trending_s

Too Many Mangos? Ideas to Help You Use Them https://delishably.com/fruits/mango-ideas

5 Easy Mango Recipe Ideas https://www.realsimple.com/food-recipes/recipe-collections-favorites/popular-ingredients/mango-recipe

Chicken Mango Curry https://producemadesimple.ca/chicken-mango-curry/

Mango Smoothie https://producemadesimple.ca/mango-smoothie/

Mango Salsa https://producemadesimple.ca/mango-salsa/

All-Purpose Mango Salsa https://www.mango.org/recipes/all-purpose-mango-salsa/

Mango Protein Smoothie https://www.mango.org/recipes/mango-protein-smoothie/

Mango Quinoa Salad https://www.mango.org/recipes/mango-quinoa-salad/

Mango Quinoa Tabbouleh https://www.mango.org/recipes/mango-quinoa-tabbouleh/

Tropical Mango Sorbet https://www.mango.org/recipes/tropical-mango-sorbet/

Baja Fish Tacos with Mango Salsa https://www.mango.org/recipes/baja-fish-tacos-with-mango-salsa/

Check out the MANY recipes listed under the “Recipes” tab on this comprehensive site https://www.mango.org

Mango Pico De Gallo https://www.mango.org/recipes/mango-pico-de-gallo/

Roasted Mango https://www.turnips2tangerines.com/2015/08/roasted-mango.html

About Judi
Julia W. Klee (Judi) began her journey enjoying “all things food” in elementary school when she started preparing meals for her family. That love of food blossomed into a quest to learn more and more about health and wellness as related to nutrition. She went on to earn a BS Degree in Food and Nutrition, then an MS Degree in Nutrition. She has taught nutrition and related courses at the college level to pre-nursing and exercise science students. Her hunger to learn didn’t stop upon graduation from college. She continues to research on a regular basis about nutrition as it relates to health. Her hope is to help as many people as possible to enjoy foods that promote health and wellness.

Resources
https://www.mango.org/about-mangos/

https://producemadesimple.ca/what-goes-well-with-mango/

https://producemadesimple.ca/mango/

http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=preptip&dbid=137

https://www.mango.org/

Page, Karen. (2014) The Vegetarian Flavor Bible. New York, NY: Little, Brown and Company.

Sugar Snap Peas

Sugar Snap Peas 101 – The Basics

Sugar snap peas are absolutely delicious, whether enjoyed raw or lightly cooked. They’re sweet, crunchy, delicious, and nutritious. AND the pods are edible, so you don’t even need to shell them! Simply give them a quick wash and pop them in your mouth…oh so good! If you haven’t tried them, please do give them a whirl. Below is a lot of information about these delectable goodies from what they are, to how to cook and flavor them, to suggested recipes, and much more.

Enjoy!
Judi

Sugar Snap Peas 101 – The Basics

About Sugar Snap Peas
Sugar snap peas, also known as snap peas, are members of the legume family. They are a cross between snow peas (flat pea pods commonly used in Asian stir-fries) and garden peas (shelled, and used in “peas and carrots”). Unlike garden peas, the whole pea, pod and all, of snap peas can be eaten. It is crunchy and sweet. They have tough “strings” at the seams of the pod that some people prefer to remove before eating the whole peas. Snap peas can be eaten whole, raw or cooked.

Nutrition Tidbits
Snap peas contain Vitamins K and C along with a variety of B-Vitamins, folate, iron and beta-carotene. They are a good source of fiber as well. One cup of snap peas has only 41 calories, no fat, and 3 grams of protein.

How to Select Sugar Snap Peas
Look for snap peas that are bright green, smooth, and without blemishes. Avoid those that are spotted, discolored, or wrinkled.

How to Store Sugar Snap Peas
Depending upon how old they are when you purchase them, snap peas can keep for up to five days in a plastic bag in the refrigerator. Discard any that have become soft or discolored.

How to Preserve Sugar Snap Peas
To freeze sugar snap peas, wash them well and remove the ends and strings if desired. Place them in boiling water for 1-1/2 minutes, then immediately place them in a bowl of ice water for 2 minutes. Remove and allow them to drain well. Place them on a tray and freeze for one or two hours, so they are frozen separately. When frozen, place them in freezer containers or bags and return them to the freezer. They will keep well like this for 8 months.

Some people choose to freeze snap peas without blanching, by simply placing the washed peas (that have been frozen individually on a tray) in a freezer bag and storing them in the freezer. If you choose to do this, use them within 4 to 6 weeks. If frozen that way, the longer they are stored, the more they will lose their color, flavor, and nutritional content.

Can they be eaten raw?
Snap peas can be enjoyed raw or cooked. The pod is edible, so you can just pop the whole thing in your mouth and enjoy the natural sweetness and crunchiness of the pea for a snack or in salads.

Quick cooking methods such as stir-frying or blanching snap peas will help to maintain their sweetness and crunchy texture.

How to Prepare Sugar Snap Peas
Of course, give your snap peas a good wash before using them. Some people prefer to remove the ends and the string that runs along the seam on the pod, although this step is not mandatory. They can be enjoyed whole or cut as needed for your recipe.

Cooking/Serving Ideas
Sugar snap peas can be eaten raw as a snack or used as a healthful and crunchy addition to any salad. They can be steamed, blanched, boiled, braised, sautéed, stir-fried, or added to soups, pasta dishes, and casseroles. To keep the crispiness of snap peas, eat them raw or cook them very briefly.

Here are some easy ideas for using sugar snap peas:

* Eat them raw as a simple snack…delicious!

* Slice them and add them to your favorite salad for sweetness and crunch.

* Sauté your sugar snap peas and top them with a little lemon zest, salt and pepper.

* Lightly coat them with olive oil, sprinkle them with garlic powder and roast at 400°F for 15 to 20 minutes (turn once during roasting), until they are as crisp and brown as you like. Sprinkle with a little Parmesan cheese and enjoy!

* Add them to a chicken or beef stir-fry dish.

* Stir-fry sugar snap peas with shredded carrots, onion, garlic, salt, pepper, and a little tamari. Serve over cooked quinoa, then top with a little lemon juice or white wine vinegar, and toasted pepitas.

* Add them to your favorite stir-fry noodle dish.

* Add sugar snap peas to orange stir-fried chicken served over rice.

* Add them to your favorite vegetable stir-fry combination.

* Slice sugar snap peas and add them to a veggie pizza.

* Add them to a salad with strawberries, avocado and walnuts on a bed of mixed greens. Top with a lemon honey vinaigrette. (See recipe link below.)

* Blanch peas for 1-1/2 minutes, then cook them for 2 minutes in a bowl of ice water. Drain then transfer them to a bowl. Top with your favorite Italian salad dressing. Enjoy!

Herbs/Spices That Go Well With Sugar Snap Peas
Basil, butter and browned butter, chervil, chives, cilantro, cumin, curry powder, dill, garlic, ginger, horseradish, marjoram, mint, mustard (Dijon), parsley, pepper (black), sage, salt, scallions, shallots, soy sauce, sugar, tarragon, thyme

Foods That Go Well with Sugar Snap Peas
Proteins, Nuts, Seeds: Beef, cashews, peanuts, peas, pine nuts, pistachios, sesame, tofu

Vegetables: Asparagus, bell peppers, broccoli, carrots, cauliflower, chiles, fennel, mushrooms, onions, radishes, water chestnuts

Fruit: Lemons

Dairy and Non-Dairy: Cheese (ie Parmesan), coconut milk, yogurt

Grains: Noodles, pasta, rice, whole grains of any sort

Other: Miso, oils, vegetable stock

Some Suggested Flavor Combinations:

Try sugar snap peas with…
basil + garlic
chiles + garlic + lemon
cumin + thyme
dill + olive oil + scallions
garlic + lemon zest + pasta
garlic + mushrooms
garlic + pine nuts
ginger + sesame oil
lemon + mint
mustard + olive oil + vinegar
noodles/pasta + peanut sauce + soy sauce
sesame oil + sesame seeds

Recipe Links
Black Pepper and Garlic Sugar Snap Pea Pasta https://www.slenderkitchen.com/recipe/black-pepper-and-garlic-sugar-snap-pea-pasta#recipe

Snap Pea and Japanese Eggplant Stir-Fry https://www.slenderkitchen.com/recipe/snap-pea-and-japanese-eggplant-stir-fry#recipe

Garlic Sugar Snap Peas https://www.slenderkitchen.com/recipe/garlic-sugar-snap-peas#recipe

Sesame Sugar Snap Peas https://www.slenderkitchen.com/recipe/sesame-sugar-snap-peas#recipe

Citrus Shrimp Salad and Sugar Snap Peas with Romaine Hearts https://producemadesimple.ca/citrus-shrimp-salad-sugar-snap-peas-with-romaine-hearts/

5 Easy Lunch Ideas with Sugar Snap Peas https://producemadesimple.ca/5-easy-lunch-ideas-sugar-snap-peas/

Scallop Fettuccine and Sugar Snap Peas https://producemadesimple.ca/scallop-fettuccine-sugar-snap-peas/

10 Minute Sugar Snap Peas With Lemon https://www.asweetpeachef.com/sugar-snap-peas/#wprm-recipe-container-20390

14 Spring Sugar Snap Pea Recipes You Need to Try This Season https://www.delish.com/cooking/g74/sugar-snap-pea-recipes/

Asian Been with Sugar Snap Peas https://www.thechunkychef.com/asian-beef-sugar-snap-peas/#wprm-recipe-container-8743

Summer Strawberry, Snap Pea, Avocado, and Walnut Salad http://healthcheflindsey.com/summer-strawberry-snap-pea-avocado-and-walnut-salad/

About Judi
Julia W. Klee (Judi) began her journey enjoying “all things food” in elementary school when she started preparing meals for her family. That love of food blossomed into a quest to learn more and more about health and wellness as related to nutrition. She went on to earn a BS Degree in Food and Nutrition, then an MS Degree in Nutrition. She has taught nutrition and related courses at the college level to pre-nursing and exercise science students. Her hunger to learn didn’t stop upon graduation from college. She continues to research on a regular basis about nutrition as it relates to health. Her hope is to help as many people as possible to enjoy foods that promote health and wellness.

Resources
https://www.thekitchn.com/whats-the-difference-between-snow-peas-sugar-snap-peas-and-english-peas-ingredient-intelligence-205118

https://www.slenderkitchen.com/article/sugar-snap-peas

https://producemadesimple.ca/the-difference-between-garden-peas-snow-peas-and-sugar-snap-peas/

https://www.thespruceeats.com/blanch-and-freeze-sugar-snap-peas-1327654

https://www.leaf.tv/articles/how-to-freeze-fresh-peas-without-blanching/

Page, Karen. (2014) The Vegetarian Flavor Bible. New York, NY: Little, Brown and Company.

Honey Glazed Carrots (Using Fresh Carrots)

Honey Glazed Carrots (Using Fresh Carrots)

Honey glazed carrots are simply delicious and not hard to make! Here’s an easy way to make them. See the recipe below the video demonstration. Enjoy!

I hope this helps!
Judi

Honey Glazed Carrots (Using Fresh Carrots)
Makes About 4 Servings

3-1/2 cups sliced fresh carrots (About 1 pound)
2 Tbsp butter*
2 Tbsp honey*
½ cup water
1 Tbsp lemon juice*
Parsley flakes, optional garnish

Wash the carrots and cut off both ends. Peeling them is optional. Cut into slices about ¼-inch to 3/8-inch thick.

Heat a skillet over medium heat. Add the butter and allow it to melt, then add the carrots. Stir to coat the carrots with the butter. Add ½ cup of water and cover the pan. Raise the heat to bring the liquid to a boil, then lower the heat to a simmer. Drizzle the carrots with the honey; stir to combine. Cover the pan and allow the carrots to cook until almost as tender as you want them to be, adding a small amount of water if needed, so all the water does not completely evaporate. When they are almost as tender as you like, remove the lid from the skillet and allow the liquid to reduce, and form the glaze. Stir often to coat the carrots. When they are glazed and cooked to your liking, remove the pan from the heat and drizzle the carrots with the lemon juice. It should take about 12 minutes to cook the carrots to crisp-tender. Sprinkle with dried or fresh parsley flakes, if desired. Serve.

*For a lighter, less sweet glaze, use 1 tablespoon of butter and 1 tablespoon of honey. Also, the lemon juice can be reduced to ½ tablespoon, if desired.

About Judi
Julia W. Klee (Judi) began her journey enjoying “all things food” in elementary school when she started preparing meals for her family. That love of food blossomed into a quest to learn more and more about health and wellness as related to nutrition. She went on to earn a BS Degree in Food and Nutrition, then an MS Degree in Nutrition. She has taught nutrition and related courses at the college level to pre-nursing and exercise science students. Her hunger to learn didn’t stop upon graduation from college. She continues to research on a regular basis about nutrition as it relates to health. Her hope is to help as many people as possible to enjoy foods that promote health and wellness.